sanvincintenor-21.jpg

Remember “Jalousie” windows? These windows made up multiple panels of long, angled glass panes have been relegated to rare use in sun-porches in the US. But, the use of Jalousie windows is ubiquitous throughout Southeast Asia and South-America. This is due to the fact that they are cheap, adaptable, and very easy to repair. In poorer nations, these considerations greatly overshadow their inherent problems. The fact that they cannot seal and have poor visibility is of little concern where repair is common and heating is unnecessary. With the growth in their economies and a cultural push to ‘westernize’, many homes are slowly being renovated. However, their original construction makes this difficult.

One problem comes from the attempt to use window insect screens . Standard windows are still prohibitively expensive and because of a lack of standard construction techniques, are generally not available in the sizes needed. The original Jalousie windows cannot accept interior screens because of their inherent design and clearance problems. Exterior screens have clearance problems as well. And due to the common use of exterior window bars for security, installation/removal would be almost impossible.

Example: Philippine homes do not use screened windows. The people usually describe this as the “open” house concept. But, people want westernization, modern conveniences. And, hardware stores are now beginning to sell screening products. Unfortunately, Philippine Jalousie windows are utilized in old concrete sash designs which cannot be easily fit with screens. Operational hardware and curved sashes in the way. Exterior security bars do not allow screen installation.

SOLUTION: Produce screening system for DIY retrofit of windows. The secret is a surface-mount system on interior wall of house. Allow screen to be ‘opened’ to access window controls. Screen is opened by sliding up-down or left-right in mounting channels, depending on installation. The solution is very simple, but does not yet exist in the market.

DETAILS:

1. Parts: common nylon screen, Standard anodized replacement screen frame and corners, screen gasket, simple flat molded-plastic handles, small 1/4″ machine screws for handles, aluminum stock for casting.

2. Cast/machine aluminum, surface-mountable, “channel-glide” bracket. Brackets mount around windows on flat surface around any rounded sash. Channel holds screen in place, channel holds nylon-nap gasket for sealing, channel has flashing strip on back with pre-drilled holes for surface-mounting around window.

3. One side of window has Modified bracket. Modified Brackets mount around windows on flat surface around any rounded sash. Bracket holds nylon-nap gasket for sealing, channel has flashing strip on back with pre-drilled holes for surface-mounting around window. However, bracket does not hold window into place- it is missing “channel-glide” overhang portion. Screen slides completely over top of it. MARKETING POINTS:Screen system keeps bugs out. Modified channel and handle allows screen to be easily shifted up or to the side to allow access to window hardware; Modified channel maintains seal while allowing for easy removal if damaged. Surface-mount system allows for use around existing installations, including barred windows. When screen is installed, screw-heads are hidden by screen frame for aesthetics. All-aluminum construction allows for easy trimming to length.

channelbracketprofile.gifmodifiedbracketprofile.gifbracketfront.gif
channelbracketdescription.gifassembly.gif

Advertisements